How’s your bedside manner, or do you have any?

Today is a special day for me, since it my anniversary. It was 31 years ago on a Saturday morning that my wife and I married. Life was never the same after that. From that point on, we learned many lessons about daily life, talking, facing challenges together and how to treat each other.


How’s your beside manner? Image courtesy of: Evalula

It’s a funny thing how you think you know all that you need to know, then after jumping into marriage, you realize there were many things you didn’t know. Not only is that a humbling experience, its’ also an on-going one as well. I have continued learning throughout my marriage.

Things as simple as how to approach your spouse when she’s sleeping, along with what to do and not to do when they are feeling sick. Although I know how I want to be dealt with, after marriage I learned new ways of doing such things. I also learned about the importance of sharing, including sharing health status and needs.

There are no mind readers in marriage or counselor’s offices. My wife still needs to know what I’m thinking, as does yours. If you haven’t opened up about health matters, I challenge you to do so. It includes them in your world and helps them understand what you’re experiencing.

It’s not about complaining about your ailments, its instead about keeping them informed.

Perhaps there are aspects of caregiving that you may need to learn that you don’t know that you weren’t aware of. In putting together the Family Caregiver Summit, I interviewed Stacey Canfield. She talked about how she approaches the elderly for caregiving.

I had assumed that most people knew how to do such things as approaching the elderly. Boy! Was I mistaken. She pointed out that in today’s society many people either don’t know or get so scared that they freeze up. They feel lost when it comes to knowing what to do or what to talk about when visiting with the elderly in hospitals or treatment settings

Stacy was even hired by some of the big hospital chains to teach their staff what she learned in this area. What amazed me was how simple it was. With a few simple steps, anyone can learn how to approach the elderly and improve their caregiving in the process.

Rather than wait until you’re thrown into caregiving and finding out how to do things the hard way, you can instead benefit from hearing how their proven approach has helped many learn skills that many thought were lost.

In previous generations, the term ‘bedside manner’ was used in describing your approach in caring for others. You can benefit from improving your bedside manner. It improves communication, improvers your connection with those you’re caring for and reduces your stress.

Best Wishes,

Jeff